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Evaluating Sources and Fighting Fake News   Tags: credibility, fact-checking, fake news, news, research, rumors, urban legends  

Consult this guide to learn how to distinguish reliable news sources from those providing false news and parody sites.
Last Updated: Oct 26, 2017 URL: http://floridacollege.libguides.com/fakenews Print Guide RSS Updates

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Fact-checking sources

Snopes.com - An urban legend dunking and fact checking site.

Politifact.com - "PolitiFact is a fact-checking website that rates the accuracy of claims by elected officials and others who speak up in American politics."

Factcheck.org - A project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center - "We are a nonpartisan, nonprofit “consumer advocate” for voters that aims to reduce the level of deception and confusion in U.S. politics."

Tineye.com - Reverse Image Search. Find out if a photo posted online has been edited

Melissa Zimdars' Google Doc - a VERY thorough document including how to analyze sources and a list of sites that have been reviewed and categorized as fake, biased, conspiracy, satire, etc.

 

Browser Apps that Check for Fake News

Check This (Meta Cert) - Available for Chrome browser.

This is Fake (Slate) - Available for Chrome browser.

B.S. Detector (excuse the name, but this is the only one of these tools that is available for a browser other than Chrome) - Available for Safari, Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Opera browsers.

 

Evaluate Your Sources

The CRAAP Test: Currency, Relevance, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose (Meriam LIbrary, California State University, Chico)

Six questions that will tell you what media to trust (American Press Institute)

Melissa Zimdars' Google Doc - a VERY thorough document including how to analyze sources and a list of sites that have been reviewed and categorized as fake, biased, conspiracy, satire, etc.

 

How To Spot Fake News (from IFLA)

How to Spot Fake News from IFLA

Inforgraphic retrieved from IFLA website: https://www.ifla.org/publications/node/11174 on August 24, 2017.

 

What is "fake news" or "false news?"

The True History of Fake News (The New York Review of Books)

List of Fake News Websites (Wikipedia)

"A Hundred Years" by C.P. Scott (1921, The Guardian), featuring the famous sentence: "Comment is Free, but Facts are Sacred."

News Use Across Social Media Platforms 2016 (Pew Research Center: Journalism & Media)

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Fake News Edition  (WNYC) - 9 minute radio broadcast, transcript, and graphic)

Breaking News Consumer's Handbook: Fake News Edition

Graphic is from WNYC article cited above.

 

How to Fight Fake News

The following tips were taken from a document created by Purchase College Library:

1. Don't Repost without Research - Always fact-check before you share!

2. Don't take the bait! - Resist the urge to click on inflammatory headlines.

3. Flag the Fakers - Facebook, Twitter, and browser apps (see box at left) let you report fake and suspicious posts.

4. Boost the signal - share and repost REAL news stories from trustworthy sources, especially reporters that counter and debunk fake stories.

5. Support Real News - Subscribe and donate to reputable news organizations. Quality journalism isn't free, but it's worth the time and money! **Your library subscribes to reliable news outlets and databases for you. Try using Newsbank for world and local news, current events, hot topics, and more. If you are off-campus, use this link.

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